Materiality

Relationship between material and contemporary jewellery

 

“Every master knows that the material teaches the artist”

Ilya Ehrenberg (a Soviet writer)

 

Ame Gallery presents "Materiality”, the dual city exhibitions that feature 16 artists from around the world to interpret materiality in contemporary jewellery.

 

Material can be referred to as the physical or conceptual properties of the artwork. The Material the artist uses can be seen as a tool or a medium to convey his/her concepts and ideas. The Material itself can also be the inspiration, which becomes the focal point of the art piece.

 

The unconventional use of materials is one of key themes in contemporary jewellery today. Artists may use any materials that inspire them in their jewellery composition to tell a story and make a statement.

 

In this exhibition, we focus on the Material chosen by the artists and how it is used as the theme in their contemporary jewellery works. The selected 16 artists’ works are showing not only a wide array of materials, but also how traditional jewellery materials such as metal and unconventional materials such as paper, eggshell or even animal intestine are being used with innovative applications and techniques. The core of their works is about the material they are using.

 

We hope this exhibition will give the audience insights into the relationship between material and contemporary jewellery.

Adelina Carmichael (Australia)
Adelina Carmichael (Australia)

Parissi Pendant Experimental Enamelling with Gem Pendant Copper, Enamel, Sterling Silver, Garnet Fire is the catalyst for my art; each work I make in some way has been created through fire. As a jeweler fire is essential to working with metal, as such elemental fire becomes integral to the work. My work reflects the classical elements of fire, water, air and earth in varying ways as I play with balancing the hand-made with nature.

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Alix Manon (Belgium)
Alix Manon (Belgium)

One Earrings Wood, Paper, Bistre, Thread, Glue, Steel Wire ‘One’ consists of two pieces that are similar but different in weight, choice of material and texture. The earrings are like sisters, they belong together but express their own personality.

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Anja Eichler (Germany / China)
Anja Eichler (Germany / China)

Void in Red Necklace Quail Eggs, Silver, Steel Wire (part of “eieiei - falling-failing-raising up again” collection) Falling hurts and might leave marks. What happens after the fall? Does falling mean failing? This series illustrates some aspects of this topic. As core material I chose quail eggs, since the egg is a womb for development. Falling and failing might be important ingredients of development.

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Masumi Kataoka
Masumi Kataoka

Untitled/ Brooch Animal Intestine, Nylon, Sterling Silver, Glue, Stainless Steel I am working on jewelry that is composed of animal intestine. This evolves from my interest in the vast amount of animal motifs symbolically used throughout human history. I like the use of animal intestine because it comes from inside, where our emotions metaphorically reside.

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Mina Kang (Korea)
Mina Kang (Korea)

Mixture Necklace, 2013 Ramie Fabric, Thread Sewing is an important expression method in my work. It is the ‘medium of poetic sensibility’ due to its visual effect on the delicate touch created by repetitive handmade work. When you are connecting stitch by stitch within various emotions, sewing eventually enable one to cultivate ability of self- control and it becomes the means to express emotions that is one’s own.

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Kee Ho Yuen (USA / Hong Kong)
Kee Ho Yuen (USA / Hong Kong)

Time out 2013 Ring, Gold plated silver, bronze, anodized aluminum, graphite, bird eye maple wood, and rock

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Lital Mendel (Israel)
Lital Mendel (Israel)

Just One More Necklace Paper Repetitive patterns have always fascinated me. The methodical recurrence of a single element, as a building block for a bigger structure, has a powerful effect that grows when more units are used. The creation of this collection always involves dealing with the conflict between the material and its "will" and my intentions as the designer.

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Lawrence Woodford (Canada)
Lawrence Woodford (Canada)

Sacred Stone, Sacred Geometry Necklace Silver, Wood, Earthenware, Paint, Topaz, Glass, Gold Leaf Creating a wearable object within an innovative framework my main area of focus and it alludes to an improvisational characteristic and aesthetic in these fabricated sculptural ornaments. I took reference from components, forms and silhouettes that have origins in traditional jewellery while I used new processes and materials allowing the tradition to evolve organically.

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Joo Hyung Park (Korea)
Joo Hyung Park (Korea)

Stone, Alive. 1 Brooch Perspex, Ink, Glue, Sterling Silver I always find big possibility in the most common material. The flow of ink and glue compressed against plastic sheets created different pattern and made each creation unique. By pressing the pieces, the liquid movement gives us the feeling of breathing. I used the most common material to make my own stone, alive.

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Jessica Armstrong (USA)
Jessica Armstrong (USA)

Drip Necklace Resin, Microbeads, Glitter, Flocking Fibers, Powder Coated, Base Metal Neckwire The materials I used played a huge role in the work I created. Resin, glass microbeads and glitter became the cornices and icicles of a Pennsylvania snowstorm or caves in Kentucky. My work became boundless. With the addition of a lack of spring and bleak winters, my curiosity to explore new mediums, color and processes ensued.

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Hana Hong
Hana Hong

Blue Bloom I Brooch Paper Towel, Sterling Silver, Linen, Cotton Thread, Steel My work is about capturing moments found in nature through the use of mundane materials. I am interested in the repetition and growth found in the natural world, as well as the multiplicity found in everyday life. Currently my work utilizes paper towels, a humble and everyday material, to create contemporary jewelry.

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Corrado De Meo (Italy)
Corrado De Meo (Italy)

A Lot of Stories Bracelet Polystyrene, Oxidized Silver, Electroformed I always project my awareness onto my jewelry during the creation process, crystallizing the phases of transformation into substance in which they are made. Matter mysteriously takes form, following those laws that regulate its structure, participating in the reality of all the things, in a world that is in constant and continuous transformation.

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Minwon Kim (Korea)
Minwon Kim (Korea)

1st Series Brooch. 2009 Corian, 3M Privacy Monitor Filter, Stainless Steel, Sterling Silver The geometric shapes are based on my research on efficient spatial compositions using linear patterns. The awareness of my construction was through sequences of divided spaces, of discoveries, of emotions and of pauses. The spaces are capable of generating an intimate dialogue between natural light and color.

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Noy Alon (Israel)
Noy Alon (Israel)

Integral Ring Gold Plated Brass, Epoxy Putty Series of jewelry made of brass and epoxy material that becomes integral to enable the creation of new jewelry with material dependence. The creation and process of the jewelry collection speaks of internal time period, the changes and transitions are expressed through quiet subtle nuance in the material and in the monochromatic colors.

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Viktoria Münzker (Austria)
Viktoria Münzker (Austria)

Yellow Richelieu Brooch 2013 Fish Scalees, Aluminium, Laccquer Whether alive or dead, animal or stone, everything has a chance to be. Through imagination, the undiscovered world of inward beings is brought to daily life till a piece of jewelry is created. The question is not "Where does my inspiration come from?" But "Where does it end?". Where it has no limits and no rules, it is inexhaustible. With myriads of sources, in all shapes and colors, it develops itself.

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Noa Liran (Isreal)
Noa Liran (Isreal)

Eggshell Necklace Quail Eggshell Know where you came from and where you are going I transformed eggshells into layered stones, and thought I will mark them with Morse signals. The Morse signals would read in Hebrew: "know where you came from and where you are going" (Mishnah, Pirkey Avot). The stones were strung into a necklace fastened with a silver box-clasp hidden in one of them. The stones, made of layered eggshells, represent chronological layers connecting past to present.

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